What is Intuition?

Codependency is a cycle that forms when one person needs the other person to be dependent on them.

 
  • A codependent relationship is one in which one person needs the other person in their life to be dependent on them.

  • There are many different types of relationships that can involve codependency. Some examples include:

  • Parent-child (parental, familial)

  • Spousal (marriage)

  • Sibling (brothers and sisters)

 

Codependency is a learned behaviour that makes it hard for people to become independent from others. Because this learned behaviour has been developed over time, it might not be immediately obvious that there is an issue when you first meet someone who has been affected by it.

It’s not easy to admit that you’re codependent, especially if you’ve been codependent for a long time.

 

It’s not easy to admit that you’re codependent, especially if you’ve been codependent for a long time. Being codependent means that the way you relate to the world—and your partner in particular—is carried out through a sense of control and self-sufficiency. You may think that you can help your partner by taking care of them. You may also believe that if they only had more willpower or motivation, then they could get clean on their own and wouldn’t need your support anymore. These are both forms of denial on your part: denying responsibility for what’s happening in this relationship, while also denying the fact that their addiction has affected both of you equally (if not more so).

 

The reason why it might seem easier for someone else to admit their codependency is because they don’t have any emotional attachment; however, this is simply not true! It takes courage for everyone involved with substance abuse treatment to admit their own issues and ask for help from others because no one wants to feel vulnerable or weak around others who haven’t faced these struggles before them yet still managed somehow…

Fear of leaving the relationship and being alone can keep someone in a relationship with an addict.

  • Fear of leaving the relationship and being alone can keep someone in a relationship with an addict.

  • Someone who is codependent may stay with someone who abuses them because they worry what will happen to the addict if they leave. They are afraid that if they left, the person would spiral out of control and end up dead or hurt themselves or someone else. This fear keeps them from leaving because it is easier to stay and take care of their partner than it is to walk away from him or her.

  • A codependent person might also be afraid of being alone after leaving their partner, especially if they have been together for a long time and do not know how to live without each other.

Sometimes codependents put their loved ones’ needs above their own.

Codependents often put the needs of others above their own. This can lead to resentment and even self-loathing. Codependent people may feel like they don’t matter or that they aren’t worthy of love or respect. They may even believe that their loved one is superior to them in some way and feel unworthy of being treated well by them. For example, a codependent person might say yes when their spouse asks them to watch their kids while they go out drinking with friends because they don’t want to disappoint their spouse—even though this would make them unhappy since they dislike spending time with children and prefer going out themselves!

 

In addition, codependents are likely to lie or cover up things that upset their partners so as not to hurt them (i.e., “I’m working late tonight” instead of “I’m actually spending my night with someone else”). This will only further distance yourself from your partner emotionally; after all, if you’re constantly hiding things from each other then how can you expect trust between yourselves?

It’s important to seek help if you’re worried that you’re codependent.

 

When you’re worried about your codependency in a substance abuse relationship, it’s important to take care of yourself. It’s also important to seek help from a professional if you feel that your partner is abusing substances and dragging them down. Try not to be afraid of reaching out for help—it can be hard work admitting that there may be something wrong with the way we’re behaving toward our partners or family members.

However, it’s important to realize that taking care of yourself doesn’t always mean ending the relationship with your loved one, even if they are engaging in substance abuse behaviours such as addiction or alcoholism. In fact, some experts recommend staying in contact with those who struggle with substance abuse while still encouraging them to seek treatment for their addiction problems. This way, both parties remain connected even when problems occur; however, these relationships should never put either person at risk for harm or danger again after seeking professional medical treatment for an underlying mental health issue (i.e., depression).

Codependency is a dynamic in which people are emotionally and psychologically dependent on each other.

Codependency is a dynamic in which people are emotionally and psychologically dependent on each other. It’s about one person needing the other person to be dependent on them, and vice versa. This could be called a codependent relationship (which can also be applied to non-romantic relationships).

 

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